SHG SPOTLIGHT: Who Do You Stay Home For?

Meet Carlee Harman

She’s the lifelong friend of SHG’s Alise Jacobs. For the past 3 years, she has served as Psychiatric RN in a Crisis Stabilization Unit at College Hospital Costa Mesa, which is otherwise known as a Behavioral Health Urgent Care. It’s a 24-hour center that can either stabilize a patient to go back home, or find an inpatient facility for them to receive further treatment. Just within the past few days, the hospital was able to provide masks for their staff, but before that became available, Carlee was wearing homemade masks. As an essential employee, Carlee still attends work every day. When she arrives to work, there is one entrance for all staff where they receive a temperature check and hospital issued mask. Every 2 hours the intercom system makes an announcement to have staff and patients to wash hands.

Carlee comes home to her husband, their 4-year-old daughter Emma, and 9-month-old son Andy, who was born last summer with two neurological birth defects. When Carlee was pregnant, they learned he would be born with Spinal Bifida. About a week after Andy was born, he was also diagnosed with a rare neurological condition called holoprosencephaly. Her biggest concern is bringing home the virus to her family, considering some of her patients come from the hospital Emergency Rooms where COVID patients have been treated. Although Andy isn’t immunocompromised, she fears that if he contracted the virus and hospitals were at capacity with COVID patients, a healthier individual may receive priority treatment. Andy also has hospital stays when he experiences complications from his conditions. If any complications occur while this crisis is going on, they would not be able to visit him the hospital. Their children are usually cared for by their grandparents while she and her husband are both at work. As like other families, they are not allowing any visitors into their home, including family for the safety of all.

We appreciate her dedication and everything she does for our family, friends, and community.

#WeStayHomeforCarlee #SHGSpotlight

Who do you stay home for?

 

Meet Matthew Mindlin

He is the husband of SHG’s Amanda Cirillo. Matt works as an Emergency Room Physician Assistant. He has been working at Capital Health (Hopewell, NJ campus and Trenton, NJ campus) for the past 5+ years. While all of their friends and family are home safe in quarantine, limiting contact with the outside world, Matt is required to attend his scheduled shifts and remain on call, being he is an essential hospital employee. Matt and Amanda have made every effort to try to limit any exposure either one of them has with friends and family, since they know they are both high risk of coming in contact with the virus at some point. They do not have any children, except a fur baby (Golden Retriever) that they have sent to live with Amanda’s parents, since the dog is too large to walk alone without Matt’s assistance (Amanda is 5 foot 1 on a good day without gravity pushing down on her head). They wanted to avoid their older parents coming into their home to limit all risk that that entails. Matt has been practicing safe hygiene – changing out of his uniform, sanitizing, washing hands, etc. They are lucky to have a laundry room with a slop sink that he can sanitize his hands inside, a special bin for only work clothes, and they make sure to run all clothing on a sanitary cycle (2+hours).

We appreciate his dedication and everything he does for our family, friends, and community.

#WeStayHomeforMatthew #SHGSpotlight

Who do you stay home for?

 

Meet Brandon Noble

He is the brother of SHG’s Christina Pereira. He is a 2nd generation Railroader, and has been working for the Union Pacific for over 15 years. The Union Pacific hauls freight across most of America, delivering materials that power hospitals, stock grocery shelves, purify water, make medicine and feed livestock. As a conductor, Brandon ensures that cargo and weight is distributed evenly along the train, while maintaining all shipping and scheduling records. He continues to work day and night on rotating shifts, on what is called a ‘board’ system, and must report to work as soon as he is called upon, as he is deemed essential to maintaining operations. He is gone for a day or two at a time, and then returns home to care for his wife and four boys, one of whom is a sweet little autistic child. Brandon has considered sending them to stay with family in a smaller town, as a preventative action to mitigate possible spread. In order to minimize the risk of exposure to its employees, while continuing to ensure essential products are delivered to hospitals, grocery stores, and other vital businesses, Union Pacific has stationed nurses across the railroad’s 23-state system to evaluate all employees, working in ordinance with health departments. Additionally, railroads have also requested enhanced cleaning of hotels and motor vehicles used by all railroad contractors.

If the railroad stops, then America stops. We are proud and thankful for the contribution that Brandon provides during this time of crisis, and the impact that is has on our community, friends, family, and COUNTRY.

#WeStayHomeforBrandon #SHGSpotlight

Who do you stay home for?

Meet Mia

She is the sister of one of SHG’s employees. As an RN for 10 years, Mia runs the in-patient dialysis at 3 different hospitals throughout Idaho. Every day she wakes up and braves the front lines in order to protect her patients and others within her community. Her experience with PPE and protocol has varied throughout the different facilities – each hospital differs in what supplies and basic needed items they are capable of providing. One hospital is only providing each RN ONE N95 mask, which they are expected to use this throughout the entirety of the crisis. Some hospitals are mandating showers in between patients cares, if they are suspected or positive to COVID, prior to taking care of other patients. For the areas that cannot provide the basic essentials, her company FMC that she works for is trying to fill those gaps and supply the needed PPE, however they are constantly met with roadblocks. Lock-down of all the hospitals has been extremely hard on nursing staff, families and patients. Policies and procedures are changing daily, even hourly, and within healthcare, it is scary to not know what is set in stone during these times. Everyone wants to be assured that they have the best of everything to protect themselves and their patients, and that is just not the case right now. Mia and her staff are fully anticipating and preparing for their hospitals to become overwhelmed, as well as the consequences of what comes with that.

Mia shares with us the following story:

“I took care of a patient just this last weekend, who was in the hospital for a completely different reason (unrelated to COVID). During this stay, her spouse and family were not able to be by her side. After multiple days passed, she was given a diagnosis of cancer, kidney failure, and progressive heart failure. She had no one to share this with – no one’s shoulder to cry on, no one to gain support and strength with. She had no one to help her deduct all the medical jargon being thrown at her, no one to help explain the whys, whats, and what ifs. As I sat and listened to her tell me what she was going through in her eyes, it was then I realized that I could not truly give her all she needed. All I could give her was a cold rubber hand to hold and an ear to listen. I became a nurse to fix all these problems for our patients, take care of them when no one else was around; yet because of protecting myself, her family, my family, and my coworkers, I couldn’t give her a hug, or a warm hand to hold. There is so much that I have to hold back for the safety of all. In this moment, I knew it will get worse. We will see sicker patients; we will all have a loved one, friend, or coworker get sick, and we will lose someone special to us. It’s just a matter of time. All I can do is my part and protect as many as I can and are able to.”

Mia comes home after a day of fighting the frontlines to her spouse and 4 children, ages 21, 17, 15, and 12. She changes into clean clothing and Clorexes her shoes and belongings prior to coming home to them. After arriving home, she then changes into fresh clothing before walking into her house, leaving shoes outside and throwing clothing into the washer, and showers before coming into contact with her children and spouse. If she directly comes into contact with a positive patient, then she self-isolates from her family, to prevent the potential risk of exposing them to anything. If this means moving to a difference place until it is “safe” then these precautions will be taken. She plans to practice all CDC guidelines, and follow all the safety plans put into place by the government and state official. Keeping herself and her children at home and protecting them to the best that she can. Controlling what can be controlled.

We appreciate her dedication and everything she does for our family, friends, and community.

#WeStayHomeforMia #SHGSpotlight

Who do you stay home for?

 

Meet Sarah Bhatia Magalona

She is the sister of SHG’s Mili Bhatia. She is a senior staff nurse at NYU Hospital/NYU Langone Health for the past 3 years. Nurses typically work 13 shifts a month at 12.5 hour increments, which equal 40 hours a week. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Sarah along with many other of her colleagues (Physicians, NPs, PAs, PCTs etc.) will be doing overtime to help manage with patient ratios and safety – which equates to overtime to exposing herself and others to the virus. After a day of battling the front lines and servicing those in need, Sarah comes home to her husband and 16-month old son, but makes sure to change out of her scrubs at the hospital prior, and leaves her nursing shoes there. At home, they have a side entrance that she comes in through – she removes all her clothing at the door and runs straight to the shower, before making any contact with her family. This has become the new normal greeting for their family, until the unforeseeable future. Although Sarah fears her exposure to the virus, she understands that as a nurse, her first obligation is for the care and safety of her patients, and their well-being. And most importantly, that they practice proper protocol.

We appreciate her dedication and everything she does for our family, friends, and community.

#WeStayHomeforSarah #SHGSpotlight

Who do you stay home for?

 

Meet Robert Montanile

He is the father of SHG’s Alex Montanile. For 15 years, Robert proudly works for the Township of Wood-Ridge wearing many hats – one of which is driving senior citizens in the town to and from grocery stores and carrying all their bags into the house for them. Once his day job in Wood-Ridge is over, he heads back home to Weehawken to attend his part time job as a security officer down at the waterfront park. There, he enforces social distancing and ensures that no one is breaking the rules of the property.

While he plays a much different role than our brave nurses and other hospital staff during these times, he still leaves a major imprint on keeping the community safe, in a proud and impactful way. While the rest of world is safe in lockdown within the comfort of their own homes, Robert has obligations to maintain providing for his community, and face the frontlines each day.

We appreciate his dedication and everything he does for our family, friends, and community.

#WeStayHomeforRobert #SHGSpotlight
Who do you stay home for?

 

Meet Angie Kaye McAffe

She is the sister of SHG’s Jason Freeman. For the past 19 years, Angie has served as a Dental Hygienist in the small town of Arco, Idaho. It’s the place where everyone knows everyone, and her patients were all neighbors, family, and friends. On March 27th, Angie and 15-20 other hygienists across the 3 practice locations were laid off from Eagle Rock Dental until mid- April, because they were not considered critical care. Two days later, the governor of Idaho announced the quarantine extension through the end of April. Before departing, Angie made a list to provide the main doctor of all her patients that had upcoming appointments for cavities and fillings, which if left untreated, could lead to toothaches and further damage. Even during her time home, she still receives phones calls and text from patients – to try to offer any assistance she can during this time, and play a vital role within her community. Angie shares that it’s been hard not be able to get up on a Monday morning, and help people in the way you know how to, in a position that you love. She spends her days redefining her happiness and learning to adjust to life without her career. She currently serves as acting principle and teacher to her 3 children – a 8th grader, sophomore, and senior, whose May graduation is now in jeopardy.

Eagle Rock Dental still operates once a week with one doctor and one assistant in the office, and they are only servicing for pain management. She still has not been able to get through the busy signal to file for unemployment.

We appreciate her dedication and everything she does for our family, friends, and community.

#WeStayHomeforAngie #SHGSpotlight

Who do you stay home for?

 

Meet Stephen Van Buskirk

He is the father of SHG’s Kate Van Buskirk. Over the course of his life, Stephen has been everything from a film developer, millwright, EMT, firefighter, printed circuit board designer/builder, and small business owner. He’s now retired, and not only is he in a high-risk category, but he is required to be present for hospital appointments multiple times a week, in order to receive IV antibiotics. In doing so, he is forced to face exposure of the virus, and put himself and others at risk. In order to play his part within the community and lower the potential risk of spreading the virus, a friend of Stephen is sewing masks and has sent him two, which he’s been wearing to his appointments. Additionally, his daughter Kate has been driving him to all his appointments, multiple times a week, to help play her part in reducing the risk on behalf of them both.

It is an honor and a privilege to do something so simple to keep our community safe, when others have sacrificed so much more for the same cause throughout history. I am also eternally grateful to #SHG supporting me and all of our staff to work from home and being so proactive about it!

We appreciate his dedication and everything he does for our family, friends, and community.

#WeStayHomeforStephen #SHGSpotlight

Who do you stay home for?

 

Meet Sharon Miller

She is the mother of SHG’s Thomas Miller. She’s been serving for 15+ years as a para-educator. Her workload is spread out between two different schools in the special education department. With her students all being on their own unique, individual curriculum, Sharon cannot create a one-size-fits-all lesson plan for the entire class; she designs unique lesson plans for each of her students, customized to their own educational styles. These last few weeks, Sharon has been busy providing her students the resources they require to get the best education possible – being in an urban school district, a lot of her students don’t have the resources and support at home for a successful education. Sharon is braving the front lines each day by going to the physical school locations to create individual work packets for parents to pick up, in order to ensure a seamless transition for these children to be learning from home.

Outside of work, she is dedicated to providing care to her live-in 95-year-old mother. As her primary caretaker, Sharon isn’t able to completely isolate herself, as much as she would like to and as much is recommended. Instead, she resorts to practicing good, thorough hygiene techniques before assisting her mother, in order to prevent the potential spread.

We appreciate her dedication and everything she does for our family, friends, and community.

#WeStayHomeforSharon #SHGSpotlight

Who do you stay home for?

 

Meet Mallarie Bascom.

She is the wife of SHG’s Joel Bascom. Mallerie works as a Police Support Specialist/Stenographer for the Pocatello, ID Police Dept for 2 ½ yrs. While all of their friends and family are home safe in quarantine, limiting contact with the outside world, Mallarie is required to attend work every day, as an essential government employee. Although they have made every effort to try and limit the exposure she has, by adjusting employee’s schedules so that there is only a few people in her office at a time, she still remains at a higher risk of contracting the virus, and even worse, bringing it back home to the family. Mallarie has 2 boys, ages 12 and 11 at home. She practices safe hygiene – changing out of her uniform, sanitizing, washing hands, etc. – before any of them can have any contact with her.

We appreciate her dedication and everything she does for our family, friends, and community.

#WeStayHomeforMallarie #SHGSpotlight

Who do you stay home for?